biodiversity conservation and sustainable use pdf form

Biodiversity Conservation And Sustainable Use Pdf Form

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The convention has three main goals: the conservation of biological diversity or biodiversity ; the sustainable use of its components; and the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from genetic resources. Its objective is to develop national strategies for the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity , and it is often seen as the key document regarding sustainable development. The convention was opened for signature at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro on 5 June and entered into force on 29 December

With 2. A growing human population, rapid economic growth and industrialisation add pressure to India's biodiversity.

Biodiversity conservation and sustainable forest management

Canadians recognize the need to maintain a healthy environment and are concerned about the degradation of ecosystems and the loss of species and genetic diversity which result from human activities. The Government of Canada, with support from provincial and territorial governments, signed and ratified the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity in , believing it to be a very important global and national instrument for promoting and guiding efforts to conserve biodiversity to use biological resources sustainably.

As soon as the Convention was ratified, work on a Canadian Biodiversity Strategy began to determine the measures which were required to meet the obligations of the Convention and to enhance coordination of national efforts aimed at the conservation of biodiversity and the sustainable use of biological resources.

The primary responsibility for conserving biodiversity and ensuring the sustainable use of biological resources is shared among provincial, territorial and federal governments. Therefore, an intergovernmental Biodiversity Working Group, with representation from every jurisdiction, was established to develop the Canadian Biodiversity Strategy by the end of Private property owners, businesses, indigenous people, conservation organizations, research institutions, foundations, and other groups also play an essential role in conserving biodiversity and sustainably using biological resources.

Thus, a national non-governmental Biodiversity Advisory Group was established to provide advice to the Working Group. The Strategy clearly recognizes that governments cannot act alone to ensure the conservation of biodiversity and the sustainable use of biological resources and therefore, invites and encourages all Canadians to take action in support of the Strategy. The Strategy recognizes that Canadians live in a global community, that co-operation with other countries is required to conserve biodiversity and sustainably use biological resources, and that Canada has an important role to play in cooperating with other countries, especially developing countries, to implement the Convention.

Conserving biodiversity and sustainably using biological resources are fundamental to achieving sustainable development. Governments, indigenous people, businesses, conservation groups, individual citizens and others have developed, or are developing, conservation and sustainable development strategies, policies and plans to work towards ecological, economic, social and cultural sustainability. The Canadian Biodiversity Strategy reaffirms that, in Canada, governments must create the policy and research conditions that will lead to the conservation of biodiversity and the sustainable use of biological resources.

The provincial, territorial and federal governments, in cooperation with stakeholders and members of the public, will pursue the implementation of the strategic directions contained in the Strategy, in accordance with their policies, plans, priorities and fiscal capabilities. Biodiversity supports human societies ecologically, economically, culturally and spiritually. Despite the importance of biodiversity, however, ecosystems are being degraded and species and genetic diversity are being reduced at an alarming rate due to the impact of a growing human population and its efforts to satisfy its needs and desires.

The global decline of biodiversity is now recognized as one of the most serious environmental issues facing humanity. Recognition of the world-wide impact of the decline of biodiversity inspired the global community to negotiate the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity.

The Canadian delegation participated actively in the negotiations of the Convention, the Prime Minister signed it at the Earth Summit in June and, in December , Canada became the first industrialized country to ratify it. These objectives illustrate the nature and breadth of the Convention. It is a global instrument which sets the stage for each nation to assess the adequacy of current efforts to conserve biodiversity and sustainably use biological resources and to determine how any gaps will be filled and opportunities realized.

A society that lives and develops as a part of nature, valuing all life, taking no more than nature can replenish and leaving to future generations a nurturing and dynamic world, rich in its diversity of life. One of the key obligations for parties that have ratified the Convention is to prepare a national strategy.

The Canadian Biodiversity Strategy is a response to this obligation and has been developed as a guide to the implementation of the Biodiversity Convention in Canada. All of the strategic directions contained in the Strategy are relevant from a national perspective, but some elements of the Strategy may not be relevant in some jurisdictions.

Federal, provincial and territorial governments, in cooperation with members of the public and stakeholders, will pursue the strategic directions set out in the Strategy, according to their policies, plans, priorities and fiscal capabilities.

In support of the Vision, the Strategy also presents a series of Guiding Principles that provide a foundation for implementing the strategic directions of the Strategy. The Strategy provides a framework for action at all levels that will enhance our ability to ensure the productivity, diversity and integrity of our natural systems and, as a result, our ability as a nation to develop sustainably.

It promotes the conservation of biodiversity and the sustainable use of our biological resources, and describes how we will contribute to, and be involved with, international efforts to implement the Convention.

The Strategy recognizes that the conservation of biodiversity and the sustainable use of biological resources and fundamental to Canada's indigenous communities. It describes mechanisms through which these communities will be able to develop their own understanding of, and response to, the Convention.

Successful implementation of the Strategy will be determined, in large measure, by the degree to which all parts of society adopt its vision and principles and contribute to achieving its goals. Ultimately, the conservation of biodiversity and the sustainable use of biological resources will require the support and participation of individual citizens, local and indigenous communities, urban and regional governments, conservation groups, business and industry, and educational and research institutions.

Although the term 'biodiversity' is relatively new to policy-makers, scientists have been warning of a global crisis for some time and have ranked the decline of biodiversity as one of the most serious global environmental threats now facing humanity.

As a result of human activities, ecosystem , species and genetic diversity are being eroded at a rate that far exceeds natural processes. This accelerating decline in diversity threatens the ecological, economic, spiritual, recreational and cultural benefits that we currently derive from the Earth's living resources. Early in the s, the world community acknowledged the threat posed by degradation of ecosystems and loss of species and genetic diversity by successfully negotiating the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity.

On December 4, , with the support of the provinces and territories, Canada became the first industrialized country to ratify the Convention, which entered into force on December 29, Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The Convention builds on and echoes the philosophy of such predecessors as Caring for the Earth, A Strategy for Sustainable Living, published in , the Brundtland Report , published in , and the World Conservation Strategy, published in All are based on the principle that development must be both ecologically and economically sustainable.

That is, our efforts to meet human needs must be carried out within the finite resources of the planet. The Biodiversity Convention is about global sustainable development, which requires the conservation of biodiversity and the sustainable use of biological resources. It conveys an understanding of the relationship between human activity and the natural world and the need to sustain living organisms, genetic diversity and the integrity of ecosystems.

It will influence, perhaps profoundly, the future of life on Earth. Implementation of the Convention will require a significant shift in the way we use and manage living things. A cooperative, cross-sectoral approach, based on partnerships, must be adopted within and among the nations of the world.

Conservation: the maintenance or sustainable use of the Earth's resources in order to maintain ecosystem, species and genetic diversity and the evolutionary and other processes that shape them. The Biodiversity Convention provides opportunities for Canada to re-examine its relationship with nature, create new global partnerships, harmonize its national activities and develop new economic opportunities.

As a party to the Convention, we are bound by its terms, including the obligation to develop a national biodiversity strategy. In response to this obligation, a Federal-Provincial-Territorial Biodiversity Working Group was established with a mandate from parks, environment, wildlife and forestry ministers to develop a Canadian Biodiversity Strategy within two years.

A national Biodiversity Advisory Group, made up of representatives from industry, the scientific community, conservation groups, academia and indigenous organizations, was established to provide advice to the Working Group.

Ten expert focus groups were convened to provide additional advice on specific Convention articles. The development of the Strategy began with an assessment of how well Canada was meeting the objectives of the Convention. Over the last decade, federal, provincial and territorial governments have developed and implemented a wide range of laws, policies and programs that support these objectives.

The assessment concluded that Federal, provincial and territorial governments, in cooperation with members of the public and stakeholders, will pursue the strategic directions set out in the Strategy according to their policies, plans, priorities and fiscal capabilities.

Canada has a strong foundation for responding to commitments under the Convention and a good basis for developing and implementing a national biodiversity strategy. It also revealed that, while it is necessary to do new things, it is sometimes more efficient to enhance or modify current efforts.

Such changes require a greater harmonization of efforts among governments and non-government agencies, as well as more integrated resource management approaches that integrate biodiversity conservation and sustainable use of biological resources with economic, social and cultural objectives. The Canadian Biodiversity Strategy has been developed as a guide to implementing the Biodiversity Convention in Canada and addressing the difficult issues posed by the loss of biodiversity. It recognizes existing constitutional and legislative responsibilities in Canada, while promoting intergovernmental cooperation to advance ecological management.

Although all of the directions contained in the Strategy are important from a national perspective, the relevance of certain elements varies across jurisdictions. Also, many initiatives currently underway support the obligations of the Convention.

Federal, provincial and territorial governments, in cooperation with members of the public and stakeholders, will pursue the strategic directions set out in the Strategy according to their policies, plans, priorities and fiscal capabilities.

Implementation mechanisms will vary among jurisdictions. In many instances, the directions outlined in the Strategy will be implemented through existing policies, strategies and plans. In other cases, new mechanisms may need to be established. Coordination will be required to promote the effective implementation of national and international elements of the Strategy. The extent, manner and timing of implementation will depend upon an evolving understanding of how ecosystems function and the effects of human activity on these ecosystems.

The Strategy may also serve as a guide for local and indigenous communities, urban and regional governments, business and industry, conservation groups, educational and scientific institutions and interested individuals. The conservation of biodiversity and sustainable use of biological resources must be pursued in tandem with social and economic goals. In order to safeguard our natural legacy, decisions must consider the needs of both current and future generations.

Conserving biodiversity and using our biological resources in a sustainable manner are essential parts of Canada's effort to achieve sustainable development. The Earth's ecosystems, species and genetic resources both individually and collectively support human society - ecologically, spiritually and culturally. Together with the development of mineral, petroleum and other non-renewable resources , they provide the basis for our economy.

The diversity of life on our planet supports vital ecological processes and provides us with a wider range of resources for human use. Ecosystems are composed of a variety of animals, plants and other organisms each of which performs a specialized role within the ecosystem. Ecosystems provide ecological services such as the conversion of solar energy into carbohydrates and protein, oxygen production, water purification and climate moderation.

They produce the soil in which we grow our crops and remove greenhouse gases from our air. Although human health depends on these ecological services, their value has never been fully appreciated by society. When we go to the pharmacy to have a prescription filled, few of us think about the connection between our medicine and biodiversity.

Yet many of today's medicines have been developed from plants found around the world. For instance, the active ingredient in aspirin was first discovered in the white willow. The diversity of the Earth's life forms provides us with a wide array of options for satisfying our needs and desires, including our need for gainful employment. Millions of people who work in agriculture, fishing and forestry rely on biological resources to earn their living.

Eco-tourism and outdoor recreation activities are an increasingly important part of our economy, as are pharmaceutical and biotechnological research and development. Many indigenous communities, particularly in the north, depend on the sustainable harvesting of biological resources to provide a large portion of their food and income.

The future of these communities and their local economies is tied directly to the sustainable use of biological resources. For many Canadians, the diversity of spaces and species in this country is a source of emotional, artistic and spiritual inspiration and cultural identity.

Indigenous people have developed, over thousands of years, an intimate cultural relationship with nature. The natural beauty of the rugged coast of Newfoundland, the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the Great Lakes, the Canadian Shield, the grassland regions of the prairies, the west coast forests and the arctic has helped shape the Canadian spirit.

Many Canadians believe that each species has its own intrinsic value, regardless of its value to humanity, and that human society must be built on respect for the life around us. They believe that we should conserve biodiversity for its own sake, regardless of its economic or other value to humans. There are tens of thousands of other edible plants on the Earth. In the future, we may need some of them to feed the world's growing population. Maintaining the Earth's biodiversity and using biological resources sustainably means keeping open our options for responding to unforeseen and changing environmental conditions.

Maintaining our potential as a country to be creative, productive and competitive will also provide us with opportunities for discovering and developing new foods, drugs and industrial products. For example, many of our native plant species must endure both cold winters and hot summers.

These plants may possess genetic material that could be used to develop agricultural crops that can withstand greater temperature ranges.

Biodiversity Test Pdf

UNV works in countries and territories, deploying UN Volunteers to advance sustainable development at grassroots level. Explore our work in the different regions of the world. On the occasion of the International Day for Biological Diversity, he shares his experience delivering communications for environmental sustainability. It is often said that experience is the best teacher. Our experiences and immediate needs shape our outlook on life. However, biodiversity and environmental issues are often too complex and difficult to relate to. Most people, in their daily routines, live and work in cities, spending the bulk of their time indoors, surrounded by concrete walls and engulfed in a world that seems largely man-made.


Another form of biodiversity which is more difficult to recognize than species diversity, is what is referred to as ecosystem diversity. An inland lake is a clear and.


Conservation and Sustainable Use of Biodiversity in India

The United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity CBD is intended to ensure conservation of biodiversity, its wise use, and sharing of benefits from use of genetic resources. When that vision is realized, biodiversity will be valued, conserved, restored, and wisely used, so it can maintain ecosystem services and sustain a healthy planet, delivering benefits essential for all humans Vision. Related to this, in , the UN created the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs , an overarching plan for people, planet, and prosperity designed to achieve a multi-faceted vision, which includes living in harmony with nature.

Biodiversity is the biological variety and variability of life on Earth. Biodiversity is typically a measure of variation at the genetic , species , and ecosystem level. Rapid environmental changes typically cause mass extinctions.

Conserving biodiversity outside the areas where they naturally occur is known as ex situ conservation. Here, animals and plants are reared or cultivated in areas like zoological or botanical parks. Reintroduction of an animal or plant into the habitat from where it has become extinct is another form of ex situ conservation. For example, the Gangetic gharial has been reintroduced in the rivers of Uttar Pradesh , Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan where it had become extinct. Seedbanks, botanical, horticultural and recreational gardens are important centres for ex situ conservation.

Canadians recognize the need to maintain a healthy environment and are concerned about the degradation of ecosystems and the loss of species and genetic diversity which result from human activities. The Government of Canada, with support from provincial and territorial governments, signed and ratified the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity in , believing it to be a very important global and national instrument for promoting and guiding efforts to conserve biodiversity to use biological resources sustainably.

Biodiversity

Existence of huge diversity of life forms is key feature of the blue planet. All the life forms ranging from bacteria to plants or animals play important roles on the only celestial body known to harbor life in the universe. These life forms are in dynamic relationship with one another. It is impossible for any life form to survive on earth without the direct or indirect support of other organisms.

Covering an area of some million hectares, around 10 per cent of the planet's tropical rainforest is to be found in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The forests form part of the Congo Basin rainforest, the second largest contiguous expanse of rainforest in the world. They boast an unparalleled variety of flora and fauna, including endangered species such as elephants, okapis, gorillas and bonobos. The forests also play a key role in stabilising the global climate and provide a livelihood for a significant proportion of the country's 80 million inhabitants. The forest resources are under threat from progressive destruction and degradation, even in protected areas such as the Kahuzi-Biega and Lomami National Parks in eastern Congo.

For many of the people living in these regions, these natural resources form the very basis of their existence. Conserving this natural wealth is therefore a crucial condition for successfully reducing global poverty. The conservation of biodiversity, sustainable use of biodiversity and equitable sharing of benefits derived from biodiversity is a cross-cutting issue within Germany development cooperation. As such, it is given consideration in all projects across the board, including for instance projects with a primary focus on other areas, such as water supply or food security. Moreover, conserving biodiversity is also a field of activity in its own right within German development policy. In line with the objectives of the Convention on Biological Diversity, the German government is supporting programmes and projects in over 30 partner countries aimed at conserving biodiversity.

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First, I used the North. Biodiversity can refer to the total number of diverse organisms on earth, or the different level of biological organization. The diversity of animals is much more than the diversity of plants because the animals are mobile and move from one place to another. SET Applicants can solve the past year papers for best Test preparations. Spread of disease D. This review introduces the subjects of bacterial biodiversity and biogeography. In many cases, if a renewable resource is not conserved properly it will become a nonrenewable resource.

4 comments

Honore J.

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Pandora M.

PDF | Environmental planning involved in protection of environment while conservation of biodiversity and sustainable use of ecological services and natural resources. eliminated 75% of all life forms living at that. time on.

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Randy E.

sible for any life form to survive on earth without the direct. or indirect sustainable use of biodiversity and fair and equitable shar-. ing of the.

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Irina B.

The main reasons for this high level of habitat diversity are the long-standing traditional forms of land-use combined with the multiple environmental gradients that.

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