global citizenship and cultural understanding pdf

Global Citizenship And Cultural Understanding Pdf

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Mainstreaming Education for Global Citizenship

I am pleased to introduce this general issue, which brings together leading scholars to reflect on critical topics ranging from global citizenship education GCE and values and ethics, to citizen identity and the role that textbooks can play in peacebuilding.

These topics are more relevant than ever. The main thrust of several articles in this issue concerns issues of interpretation of a field that is still trying to find its feet. Refreshingly free from the usual limited, and typically Western-centric and neoliberal, conceptions of GCE, these articles make a remarkable attempt to expand the definition of GCE and to think through its long-term possibilities.

Running through all the articles in this issue is that same kind of acute moral sensibility, collective self-questioning, and sometimes uncomfortable truth-telling.

This article-dialogue addresses current criticisms of global citizenship and challenges frequent misinterpretations of GCE. It starts by considering the phenomenon of globalization and the UN Global Education First Initiative, which aims to further global citizenship and to highlight the relationship between GCE, global peace, global commons, and the common good.

Education Watch, a civil-society group in Bangladesh that monitors progress in pre-tertiary education in the country, took the promotion of ethics and values through school education as the subject for its report. This article describes the methodological concerns and how the MGIEP comparative study and the Bangladesh study address those concerns.

The SDG agenda, particularly Target 4. Finally, the conclusion points to implications for further research and policy discourse. Kubow examines the social ontological perspectives of 92 young female students through an analysis of their views on citizen identity and the citizenship discourse promoted in three all-girl double-shift secondary schools in Amman.

Jordan, after Turkey and Lebanon, has one of the highest populations of Syrian refugees in the world. To address the issue of overcrowding in schools, a double-shift system operates, whereby Jordanian students receive schooling in the morning and Syrian and other refugee students in the afternoon.

This empirically grounded, qualitative scholarship serves as a call for more youth studies on citizen identity in the Arab world. Using the data collected from a comparative study of the Learner Profile in nine International Baccalaureate schools in India, Hong Kong, and Australia, the authors question the widely held belief that understandings of the key attributes of the Learner Profile are nationally inflected. They suggest, instead, that these schools relate to their localities in a range of complex and multifaceted ways, and that the differences between individual schools within the same country are often more significant than differences between nations when it comes to putting the Learner Profile into practice.

Jeffery and Catherine van Beuningen present a cross-continental examination of the wide variation that exists with regard to how policymakers address the challenges of providing language education.

They argue that across the globe, linguistically heterogeneous populations increasingly define school systems at the same time that developing the ability to communicate cross-culturally is becoming essential for internationalized economies. While these trends seem complimentary, they often appear in paradoxical opposition, as represented in the content and execution of nationwide education policies.

Their analysis reveals parallel tensions among aims for integrating immigrant populations, closing historic achievement gaps, fostering intercultural understanding, and developing multilingual competences. To consider implications of such paradoxes and parallels in policy foundations, the authors compare language education in the US and in the EU focusing on the Netherlands as an illustrative case study.

While peace and social acceptance of diversity and gender equality are sometimes explicitly promoted, there is an overarching emphasis on maintaining and accepting social norms without critically interrogating the social structures that can foster inequality and lead to conflict. This analysis positions the textbooks primarily as accomplices to conflict, with some movement toward transformation, across the themes of religion and ethnicity, governance, gender, and conflict.

Seungah S. Based on a longitudinal dataset of over social-science textbooks from around the world, she argues that textbooks have increasingly incorporated global awareness, global agency, and skills to recognize multiple perspectives. This view is especially adopted in textbooks from countries that are democratic and embedded in the international community. I hope the articles in this issue will rekindle new interest in GCE, values, and identities.

Even if they invite no easy answers, we must learn once again how to pose the questions. Torres, C. Global citizenship education at the crossroads: Globalization, global commons, common good, and critical consciousness. Download references. Box , , Geneva, Switzerland.

Correspondence to Simona Popa. Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Popa, S. Global citizenship education, identities, and values: New insights and perspectives. Prospects 48, 95—97 Download citation. Published : 23 July Issue Date : July Search SpringerLink Search. Download PDF.

References Torres, C. Additional information Publisher's Note Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. About this article. Cite this article Popa, S.

Mainstreaming Education for Global Citizenship

This paper discusses GCED in Sub-Saharan Africa in the context of the post education agenda, with a particular focus on adult education. Efforts towards achieving Education for All EFA has since its inception in yielded significant progress. As a result, there is a strong need for a forward-looking agenda that will complete the unfinished business while going beyond the current goals. There are emerging trends and development challenges in a globalised, inter-connected world, and their implications for education and training. In Africa, the rising issues, such as population growth, youth bulge, urbanisation, climate change and inequalities have urged policymakers to re-prioritise their policies, leading to structural transformation for inclusive and people-centred development African Union A future education agenda must explore how education systems should adapt to tackle new challenges and contribute to peace and sustainable development.

It is a way of living that recognises our world is an increasingly complex web of connections and interdependencies. One in which our choices and actions may have repercussions for people and communities locally, nationally or internationally. Global Citizenship nurtures personal respect and respect for others, wherever they live. It encourages individuals to think deeply and critically about what is equitable and just, and what will minimise harm to our planet. Exploring Global Citizenship themes help learners grow more confident in standing up for their beliefs, and more skilled in evaluating the ethics and impact of their decisions.

Moreover, the notion of civic education and engagement has expanded from constituting more of a national focus to one which is global. This in turn, highlighted the reality that civic responsibility is a notion that extends beyond national borders, as well as beyond the scope of one state. Global Citizenship is not new in discourse; however, both the notion as well as the term seems to be witnessing more attention lately as they are both being highlighted across discussions in higher education. Several institutions make reference to global citizenship in their mission statements, as well as make it a goal of theirs in their quest for more liberal education and internationalization efforts. International organizations such as Oxfam among others currently offer a number of definitions which intersect in their approach. Effective Global Citizens are usually flexible, creative and pro-active. They are able to solve predicaments, make pragmatic decisions, think in a critical manner, communicate ideas efficiently and effectively and also adapt and maneuver well within a team or group dynamic.


Keywords Global Citizenship, Cultural Intelligence, making active efforts to understand others' cultural norms /Learning_Teach_Knowledge_ccofmc.org


Mainstreaming Education for Global Citizenship

Through it, the global community agreed to ensure knowledge, skills, values and attitudes of citizens to lead productive lives, make informed decisions and assume active roles locally and globally with facing and resolving global challenges. To do this, it is important first to reflect practically about the skills and competences of a global citizen and then develop strategies to promote global citizenship education laying out innovative approaches of how these strategies could be implemented at national policy and school levels. Rapid advancement in information and technology fields create lots of uncertainty for future jobs. To prepare for this uncertainty, students need to develop non-cognitive skills besides practical and technical cognitive core skills such as literacy, numeracy, Information and Communication Technology ICT and financial literacy. Current and future generations should have competences to be able to solve complex challenges of the 21 st century.

Global citizenship education is one of the fastest growing educational reform movements today. Although still in its incipient stages, it has support from all corners—teacher unions, governments, corporations, foundations, global institutions, etc. It is best understood as a pedagogical response to the problems, challenges, and opportunities of globalization: migration, cultural difference, environmental crises, and a growing list of global social problems.

I am pleased to introduce this general issue, which brings together leading scholars to reflect on critical topics ranging from global citizenship education GCE and values and ethics, to citizen identity and the role that textbooks can play in peacebuilding. These topics are more relevant than ever. The main thrust of several articles in this issue concerns issues of interpretation of a field that is still trying to find its feet. Refreshingly free from the usual limited, and typically Western-centric and neoliberal, conceptions of GCE, these articles make a remarkable attempt to expand the definition of GCE and to think through its long-term possibilities. Running through all the articles in this issue is that same kind of acute moral sensibility, collective self-questioning, and sometimes uncomfortable truth-telling.

Mainstreaming Education for Global Citizenship

What is Global Citizenship?

Global citizenship is the idea that one's identity transcends geography or political borders and that responsibilities or rights are derived from membership in a broader class: "humanity". This does not mean that such a person denounces or waives their nationality or other, more local identities, but that such identities are given "second place" to their membership in a global community. In general usage, the term may have much the same meaning as " world citizen " or cosmopolitan , but it also has additional, specialized meanings in differing contexts. Various organizations, such as the World Service Authority , have advocated global citizenship. In education, the term is most often used to describe a worldview or a set of values toward which education is oriented see, for example, the priorities of the Global Education First Initiative led by the Secretary-General of the United Nations.

The ongoing globalisation has led to a tremendous expansion of the English language. With China striving to become part of the world economy since the late 's, there has been a great emphasis placed on the education of young people to become a world citizen with fluent English. All this however needs to be realized through communication in English, the world language. Improving communicative competence among Chinese learners of English depends on how English is learnt in the FL classroom and how it gets practiced outside the classroom.

EDU И далее текст сообщения: ГРОМАДНЫЙ ПРОГРЕСС. ЦИФРОВАЯ КРЕПОСТЬ ПОЧТИ ГОТОВА. ОНА ОТБРОСИТ АНБ НАЗАД НА ДЕСЯТИЛЕТИЯ. Сьюзан как во сне читала и перечитывала эти строки. Затем дрожащими руками открыла следующее сообщение.

Cultivating a Universal Global Consciousness

 После вас, Сью, - сказал. ГЛАВА 41 В кладовке третьего этажа отеля Альфонсо XIII на полу без сознания лежала горничная. Человек в очках в железной оправе положил в карман ее халата связку ключей. Он не услышал ее крика, когда ударил ее, он даже не знал, кричала ли она вообще: он оглох, когда ему было всего двенадцать лет от роду. Человек благоговейно потянулся к закрепленной на брючном ремне батарее: эта машинка, подарок одного из клиентов, подарила ему новую жизнь. Теперь он мог принимать заказы в любой точке мира.

Бесконечная работа компьютера. Невзламываемый шифр. Но это полный абсурд. Неужели Хейл никогда не слышал о принципе Бергофского. - Вот что нам надо сделать.

Хейл появился в порядке возмещения ущерба.

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